post-publication review

Interview with Anne Færch Nielsen

Anne Færch Nielsen is a molecular biologist from Denmark and she is an editor at the EMBO Journal. She received her PhD from Aarhus University and the Ribonucleic acid took her from there to Vienna and finally to Heidelberg. As an editor she is responsible for her chemicals and things that go on inside the cell. She followed the debate on the ‘STAP’ (Stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency) cells that rocked the stem cell field since the beginning of the year. We asked her about her thougths on the developments and the connection with post-publication peer review. All opinions are her own, not EMBO’s.

 

AFN

End of January two papers in Nature by Obokata et al. claimed a new method to create pluripotent stem cells in a surprisingly simple way. How was the first reaction in your professional environment to the big news? (more…)

Public discussion of problematic studies increases the number of corrective actions. True?

Several online forums developed over the last years to foster open discussion of peer-reviewed scientific publications, PeerPub and PeerJ are two of them. The integrity of data is central to the discussion – assuming that discussed openly problems with data will helo to correct the scientific record.

But is this assumption justified?

Paul S. Brookes, a researcher at the University of Rochester in the United States, wanted to find out. He created a blog as a platform for people to submit questionable data along with the respective publications to him to be published and discussed in an open forum. (more…)

New Avenues for Peer Review: An (Audio) Interview with Eva Amsen

eva_headshotOn the 3rd April PeerReviewWatch hosted a panel discussion at City University in London titled ‘Peer Review is broken. How can we fix it?’ In the audience were some members of F1000 Research, who participated actively in the discussion live and on Twitter. F1000 Research is an open access but importantly open peer-review journal – the most open of its kind today, says Eva Amsen, who is the outreach director of the journal here in London.

One day after the panel at City, I met her in a coffee shop near Goodge Street to talk about peer review.

 

Purposely, we left the panel discussion at City wide open for different aspects of peer review. Somehow the conversation came back to the topic of ‘open peer review‘ a couple of times. As F1000 Research is at the forefront of this development, I asked Eva to explain open peer review and the difference between doing it pre- or post-publication. (more…)

Live Blogging a Panel Discussion: In Science we trust. Do we?

On March 15th the University of Cambridge held a panel discussion as part of their science festival: In science we trust – Traditional publihsing, open access, post-publication review. Panelists were: