history

Timeline: History of Peer Review

Screen Shot 2014-03-23 at 16.16.49

From the church trying to control everything to open access, peer review has seen some major changes and worn some interesting hats. It has taken a long time for peer review to become what it is today.  Click on the photo to navigate through the history of peer review and find out how peer review developed into the gold standard of science we know today.

Most of the data is thanks to Thomas H.P. Gould’s wonderful book Do We Still Need Peer Review? An argument for change.  For more history on the first academic journal check out the Liveblog: (Re) Inventing Science Publishing.

Advertisements

Liveblog: (Re) Inventing Science Publishing at The Royal Society

The Royal Society hosted a lunch time lecture about science publishing. More specifically about the first scientific journal the Philosophical Transaction.

People were excited… well as much as history and science academics can get excited.

So off I went to liveblog it, even though you weren’t supposed to have phones. (more…)

Is Groupthink Ruining Peer Review?

6842682139_0b9cf529fe_ophotograph: Luc Melanson

Groupthink could be the crack in the corner stone of science, peer-review, and open access may be a possible solution, suggests one expert.

Groupthink is a psychological phenomenon where more emphasis is placed on consensus than free thought when making a decision. The result is often poor decisions as everyone is so focused on conformity they forget to consider the caveats of their choice. Irving Janis, the father of groupthink theory, outlines that there are eight symptoms of groupthink, which make it more likely for the phenomenon to happen, such as the group is small and defined with unified decision-making powers.

(more…)