Author: Lindsay McKenzie

The Peer Review Watch Gallery: Tumblr blog

A collection of my favourite images, videos and articles relating to peer review.

Some humorous, some critical, all informative.

Enjoy!

Advertisements

Opinion Poll: Should Peer Reviewers be paid?

An interesting question arose at the Peer Review: Nuts and Bolts workshop on the 25th of April – should peer-reviewers be paid?

Rubriq are one publisher who pay their reviewers, saying:

“First, philosophically we feel that reviewers should be compensated for the valuable service they provide for the scientific community. Second, providing payment makes the process more formal, and can lead to more standards, training, and recognition. Finally, in order to be able to deliver high-quality, consistent reviews in a two-week timeline, it is important to provide compensation for that commitment. And by offering reviewers the option of an honorarium in lieu of payment, some of those earnings can even go directly back into research organizations.”

But what do you think?

Have your say in this poll:

You can also listen to the views of a selection of young academics here:

Interview with Elizabeth Moylan, Biology Editor at BioMed Central

photo (3)

Elizabeth Moylan

Elizabeth Moylan completed her PhD at the University of Oxford and worked as a post doc before moving into publishing. She is currently Biology Editor at BioMed Central, an open access publisher. In her role as Biology Editor, Elizabeth has editorial responsibility for the biology journals, oversees editorial polices and manages the peer review process.

Speaking at the recent Peer Review: The Nuts and Bolts workshop hosted by Sense about Science on April 25th, Elizabeth was asked to expand on the issue of ‘professional’ peer review, an interesting and novel topic for many in the audience. I asked Elizabeth to share her thoughts on this issue and others below:

What is ‘professional’ peer review?
(more…)

LiveBlog: Scientific publishing – the past, present and future of the scientific journal

Can’t get enough of peer-review? You’re in the right place!

Peer Review Watch will be LiveBlogging a special seminar on “Scientific Publishing – the past, present and future of the scientific journal” at Imperial College London at 6pm today.

This event is organised by the Society of Spanish Researchers in the United Kingdom, and promises to be an exciting evening of peer-review themed discussion, as the organisers have deliberately chosen three speakers with opposing views on the issues of pay-walls, anonymity and impact factors.

Follow the action on twitter with #SRUKevents and get involved!

If you would like to attend this event, tickets are free and are still available here.

While you’re on EventBrite, make sure you register for our own upcoming event “Peer-review is broken, how do we fix it?” to be held at City University London on April 2nd at 6pm!

Check out the LiveBlog here!

Coveritlive

How to Measure the Influence of a Journal

In scientific publishing, journal metrics are used to determine the influence of a scholarly journal. Each metric is different, but generally they count the number of citations a journal receives in other people’s work (a sign that the work has been deemed important). Today, the Thomson Reuters Impact Factor published in  Journal Citation Reports (JCR) is the most established journal metric, but other metrics are becoming increasingly important – this infographic provides a simple summary of some of the biggest. Journal Metrics Copy(1)